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Author Guidelines

CONTRIBUTIONS

Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Research welcomes previously unpublished articles in the field of social sciences and humanities. The contributions can take the form of original research papers, review articles, book reviews, case studies, reports, and interviews. Please refer to the quick style guidelines when preparing your paper. Contributions should be submitted electronically through the Journal Management System: http://journals.iobmresearch.com/index.php/JSSHR/. This will require registering as an author as well as fulfilling a number of conditions listed on the website. In case of queries, please feel free to contact us at jsshr@iobm.edu.pk

QUICK STYLE GUIDELINES

Manuscript Structure: Your paper should be compiled in the following order:

  1. Cover Page (Separate sheet; see details below);
  2. Manuscript including:
  • Manuscript Title
  • Abstract
  • Keywords;
  • Main text sections should include:
  1.  Introduction
  2. Literature Review
  3. Research Methodology
  4. Findings
  5. Discussion
  6. Conclusion
  7. References

Format: Manuscripts should be submitted as Microsoft Word file titled ‘Manuscript-Submission Title’. In cases where extensive graphics or phonetic symbols are used an accompanying PDF file is recommended.

Font: Times New Roman, 12 point, double-line spaced. Use margins of at least 2.5 cm (or 1 inch).

Cover Page (Separate sheet)

A separate cover page should be provided which should include:

  • Manuscript Title (maximum 15 words);
  • Full names of all the authors;
  • Affiliation(s) of all the authors (names and postal addresses of the institution);
  • e-mail of all the authors.
  • Biographical note about the author(s) (maximum 100 words);
  • Corresponding author: Clearly indicate who will handle correspondence at all stages of refereeing and publication, also post-publication.
  • Acknowledgements (if any): Please submit the acknowledgements in the title page of your submission. Do not include them in the main source file of your submission. In the acknowledgements, provide information on grants received for research etc.).

 Manuscript Title

  • Maximum 15 words;
  • Use bold for your article title, with an initial capital letter for any proper nouns.

Abstract 

  • a concise abstract of 150-200 words;
  • References should be avoided in the abstract;
  • Also, non-standard or uncommon abbreviations should be avoided, but if essential they must be defined at their first mention in the abstract itself.

Keywords 

  • Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 5 keywords. These will be used to index your article on search engines;
  • Each keyword should begin with an initial capital letter and must be separated by a semi-colon (;).

 Manuscript Main Text: The manuscript should include:

 

  • Length: Papers should be in the range of 4000-6000 words and book reviews about 1000 words excluding references.
  • Headings and Subheadings: Please indicate the level of the section headings (up to three) in your paper.

Level 1: Flush left, boldface, and Upper and Lowercase Heading (e.g. Introduction, Conclusion).

Level 2: Flush left, boldface, italicised, and Upper and Lowercase Heading (e.g. Theoretical Perspectives)

Level 3: Flush left, italicised, and Upper and Lowercase Heading (e.g. Dynamism)

Note:   Do not use a numbering or lettering system for headings.

  • Format: Flush left all paragraphs. Use single line spacing between paragraphs. 
  • Word count: Please include a word count for your paper preceding the Reference section.

Tables: Indicate in the text where the tables should appear, for example by inserting [Table 1 near here]. Please submit tables as editable text and not as images. Tables should be supplied in a separate file. Number tables consecutively in accordance with their appearance in the text and place any table notes below the table body. Be sparing in the use of tables and ensure that the data presented in them do not duplicate results described elsewhere in the article. Please avoid using vertical rules and shading in table cells.

Figures: The actual figures should be supplied as separate files. Indicate in the text where the figures should appear, for example by inserting [Figure 1 near here]. Ensure that each figure/illustration has a caption. A caption should comprise a brief title (not on the figure itself) and a description of the illustration. Keep text in the illustrations themselves to a minimum but explain all symbols and abbreviations used. Figures should be high quality (1200 dpi for line art, 600 dpi for grayscale and 300 dpi for colour, at the correct size). Figures should be supplied in one of our preferred file formats: JPEG, GIF, or Microsoft Word (DOC or DOCX).

Ensure you have permission to use any tables or figures you are reproducing from another source.

Running heads and received dates are not required when submitting a manuscript for review; they will be added during the production process.

Spelling and punctuation: Please use standard British spelling of words such as ‘centre’ or ‘colour’. Where British English has alternative spellings of words such as ‘recognize’/‘recognise’, please use the ‘z’ form, e.g. ‘summarize’. But note that in British English ‘analyse’ is spelt with ‘s’. Please use ‘for example’ in the text and ‘e.g.’ in lists of tables/figures. There should be no comma after ‘e.g.’ or ‘i.e.’. 

Please ensure whichever punctuation style you use is applied consistently. Please use: cooperative, email (no hyphen); internet (capital letter not necessary, but please be consistent); online (no hyphen); per cent (two words – only use % in tables/figures); sociocultural (no hyphen); website (no hyphen); learnt (not learned); focus, focuses, etc. (one ‘s’); none the less (three words); on to (two words).

Numbers: One to ten (in words), 11, 12, and so on in figures, unless these appear at the beginning of a sentence or when both a small and large number appear in the same sentence, e.g. … ‘5 classes of 28 …’. When using thousands, please use a comma separator, e.g. 2,500. Fractions should be written in words and hyphenated. Percentages in the text are normally given as whole numbers, e.g. 27 per cent, but can be given with decimal points in tables/figures where necessary.

Abbreviations: Abbreviations and acronyms that are not standard in this field should be spelled out in full at first mention, whether in the abstract or the article itself. Ensure consistency of abbreviations throughout the article.

Reference style: The manuscripts must conform to the specifications of Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (sixth edition).

APA in-text citation

Author's name not incorporated into a sentence in the article:

When testing the usability of a website, it is necessary to gather demographic information about the users (Lazar, 2006).

Author's name incorporated into a sentence in the article:

Lazar (2006) notes that a fundamental part of usability testing is understanding the demographics of the users.

Two authors: 

According to Samson and Daft (2005), the …

… from the influence of pressure groups (Samson & Daft, 2005).

3-5 authors

First in-text citation: (Cunningham, Nikolai, & Bazley, 2004)

Later in-text citations: (Cunningham et al., 2004)

In the reference list: Cunningham, B. M., Nikolia, L. A., & Bazley, J. D. (2004). Accounting: Information for business decisions (2nd ed.). Mason, OH: Thomson/South-Western.

6-7 authors: the first author and ‘et al.’ is used in both the first and subsequent citations. All authors are used in the reference list.

8+ authors: the first author and ‘et al.’ is used in both the first and subsequent citations. The first six authors and the final author and used in the reference list, with an ellipsis (. . .) between them.

Entries with the same author(s) and year of publication

According to Johnson (2002a), the …

Johnson (2002b) argued that…

Direct quotations

When gathering data it is important to remember that “only relevant types of demographic information should be requested” (Lazar, 2006, p. 52).

For quotations longer than 40 words, the quotation is indented:

Lazar (2006) describes the delicate balance of survey design:

Only relevant types of demographic information should be requested. Asking inappropriate questions in a survey, interview, or focus group lessens the likelihood that users will respond. Also, if too many questions are asked, users are less likely to respond. (p. 52)

The number of questions depends greatly on…

Source quoted word-for-word

When gathering data it is important to remember that “only relevant types of demographic information should be requested” (Lazar, 2006, p. 52).

Reference within a source (secondary source)

The work of Chi, Pirolli, and Pitkow (as cited in Lazar, 2006)

Citing a source multiple times in one paragraph

Lazar (2006) describes several aspects of the data gathering process. He notes that the relevance and number of questions can affect participation rates. Lazar also found that…

Multiple sources within the same brackets

(Durie, 2003; McShane & Travaglione, 2007; Ministry of Education, 1996)

Integrating quotations with your writing

According to Vaughan and Hogg (1995), “social psychologists …” (p. 2).

Vaughan and Hogg (1995) state that “social psychologists …” (p. 2).


APA reference list

  • The reference list appears at the end of the assignment, under the heading “References”. 
  • Reference List should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary.
  • List format: Every entry in an APA reference list has a hanging indent of 0.5".

References

Bowker, N., & Tuffin, K. (2002). Users with disabilities' social and economic development through online access. In M. Boumedine (Ed.), Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Information and Knowledge Sharing (pp. 122–127). Anaheim, CA: ACTA Press.

Durie, M. (2003). Ngā kāhui pou: Launching Māori futures. Wellington, New Zealand: Huia Publishers.

Hazledine, T., & Quiggan, J. (2006). Public policy in Australia and New Zealand: The new global context. Australian Journal of Political Science, 41(2), 131–143.

Ministry for Primary Industries. (2012). Rural communities. Retrieved from http://www.mpi.govt.nz/agriculture/rural-communities

Books

Durie, M. (2003). Ngā kāhui pou: Launching Māori futures. Wellington, New Zealand: Huia Publishers.

Rountree, K., & Laing, T. (1996). Writing by degrees: A practical guide to writing theses and research papers. Auckland, New Zealand: Addison Wesley Longman.

Book (later edition)

McShane, S., & Travaglione, T. (2007). Organisational behaviour on the Pacific Rim (2nd ed.). North Ryde, Australia: McGraw-Hill.

Chapter in an edited book

Markusen, A. R. (1996). The economics of postwar regional disparity. In S. S. Fainstein & S. Campbell (Eds.), Readings in urban theory (pp. 102–131). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

Heath, I. (2008). Domestic violence: A family health perspective. In J. Keeling & T. Mason (Eds.), Domestic violence: A multi-professional approach for healthcare practitioners (pp. 167–175). Maidenhead, England: Open University Press.

Chapter in an edited book

Markusen, A. R. (1996). The economics of postwar regional disparity. In S. S. Fainstein & S. Campbell (Eds.), Readings in urban theory (pp. 102–131). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

Heath, I. (2008). Domestic violence: A family health perspective. In J. Keeling & T. Mason (Eds.), Domestic violence: A multi-professional approach for healthcare practitioners (pp. 167–175). Maidenhead, England: Open University Press.

Journal article

Castles, F. G., Curtin, J. C., & Vowles, J. (2006). Public policy in Australia and New Zealand: The new global context. Australian Journal of Political Science, 41(2), 131–143.

Online journal article

Hsing, Y., Baraya, A., & Budden, M. (2005). Macroeconomic policies and economic growth: The case of Costa Rica. Journal of Applied Business Research, 21(2), 105–112. Retrieved from http://journals.cluteonline.com/index.php/JABR/

Baxter, S. (2009). Learning through experience: The impact of direct experience on children's brand awareness. Marketing Bulletin, 20. Retrieved from http://marketing-bulletin.massey.ac.nz/V20/MB_V20_A2_Baxter.pdf

Conference and symposium proceedings

Published

Bowker, N., & Tuffin, K. (2002). Users with disabilities' social and economic development through online access. In M. Boumedine (Ed.), Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Information and Knowledge Sharing (pp. 122–127). Anaheim, CA: ACTA Press.

Unpublished

Stewart-Withers, R.R. & Brook, M.S. (2008, December). Sports as a vehicle for development: The influence of rugby league in/on the Pacific. Paper presented at the Aotearoa New Zealand International Development Studies Network Conference, Wellington, New Zealand.

Thesis or dissertation

Bowker, N. I. (2003). What it means to be online for people with disabilities(Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Magazine article

Jianying, H. (2007, July). Qing tomb enigmas. China Today, 56(7), 72–76.

Online magazine article

The domino effect. (2008, July 3). The Economist. Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/node/11667810?story_id=11667810

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

The Digital Object Identifier is a unique number allocated to an online publication. It is often used to identify online journal articles and other online documents.

If an online document has a DOI, use it instead of the URL address:

Gelkopf, M., Ryan, P., Cotton, S., & Berger, R. (2008). The impact of “training the trainers” for helping tsunami-survivor children on Sri Lankan disaster volunteer workers. International Journal of Stress Management, 15(2), 117–135. https://doi.org/10.1037/1072-5245.15.2.117

 

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submitted manuscript is in English
  2. The manuscript is submitted as Microsoft Word file titled ‘Manuscript-Submission Title’.

  3. The author has been designated as the corresponding author with contact details (email address & full postal address).

  4. All necessary files that is, Cover Page on Separate sheet, Manuscript, Supplemental files (where applicable) have been uploaded.
  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the quick style guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  6. All identifying information has been removed from the manuscript, including the file name itself.
  7. Manuscript has been 'spell checked' and 'grammar checked'.
  8. All references mentioned in the Reference List follow APA 6th Edition and are cited in the text, and vice versa.
  9. Manuscript does not exceed the word limit.
  10. Permission has been obtained for use of copyrighted material from other sources (including the Internet)
  11. Relevant declarations of interest have been made.
  12. Journal policies detailed in this guide have been reviewed.
  13. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).

 

Copyright Notice

Upon acceptance of an article, authors will be asked to complete a 'Journal Publishing Agreement'. An e-mail will be sent to the corresponding author confirming receipt of the manuscript together with a 'Journal Publishing Agreement' form or a link to the online version of this agreement.

Subscribers may reproduce tables of contents or prepare lists of articles including abstracts for internal circulation within their institutions. Pwemission of the Publisher is required for resale or distribution outside the institution and for all other derivative works, including compilations and translations. If excerpts from other copyrighted works are included, the author(s) must obtain written permission from the copyright owners and/or credit the source(s) in the article.

 

Privacy Statement

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